Mr Kramarsky Emphasis

Old Tall Ship Masts Painting by Deering

Old Ship Masts Painting signed by artist Deering

Vintage Native American Scene Pottery Canteen

Approximately 9 inches in height, about 9 inches wide at middle, and roughly 4 inches deep. It is hollow inside and includes a 'stopper' for its top opening

1974 Painting By Colonel Dorotha Garrison (FOR SALE)

The 3 Images Below Were Taken With A Flash Equipped 12MP Digital Camera On April 27 ’11

signed as d.garrison'74 | labeled Dorotha Garrison Col., USA, RET. on back

signed as d.garrison'74 | labeled Dorotha Garrison Col., USA, RET. on back

drawing by Colonel Dorotha Garrison U.S. Army Retired signed d.garrison'74

The painting of Flowers In A Vase, done in 1974 by Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison, is reminiscent of Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers oil painting series. Below is a public domain image of two of Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers paintings

The “Cat” drawing done by Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison in 1974 brings to mind the manner of Francisco de Goya y Lucientes’ drawing “El toro mariposa” (“The Butterfly Bull”), public domain image below

The 2 Images Below Were Taken With A Very Low MP(megapixel/resolution) Non-Flash Equipped Digital Camera In November ’04

signed as d.garrison'74(Col., USAR, Ret.); labeled Dorotha Garrison Col., USA, RET. on back

drawing by Colonel Dorotha Garrison U.S. Army Retired signed dgarrison '74

Retirement Ceremony for Brigadier General Elizabeth P. Hoisington: Part I (youtube.com video | without audio)

{Description of Video: Brigadier General (BG) Elizabeth Hoisington, Chief Women Army Corps and Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison, Commanding Officer, U.S. Army WAC Center, Fort McClellan, standing on parade field. Colonel Garrison is the very tall lady. Later in video General William Westmoreland pins Distinguished Service Medal on Brigadier General Hoisington, kisses her, and then shakes hands with her.}

U.S. Army Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison is the very tall lady 3rd from the front of the line

 

RETREAT CEREMONY AT HOISINGTON WALK, WAC CENTER, 30 July 1970. Brig. Gen. Elizabeth P. Hoisington with Cols. Maxene B. Michl, Dorotha J. Garrison, and Georgia D. Hill (left to right).

http://www.history.army.mil/books/wac/chapter12.htm is a link to a webpage with significant information regarding Colonel Garrison’s military service. Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison retired on October 1, 1972. note: The link will open a new webpage.

Retirement Ceremony for Brigadier General Elizabeth P. Hoisington: Part II (youtube.com video | without audio)

Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison reached the higher echelons of service in the U.S. Army early in the history of women in the military. I am told 20 years is required to achieve the rank of full Colonel, as Ms. Garrison did, and, in 1968, I am told there were only 2 female full Colonels.

As Commanding Officer of the Fort McClellan Alabama WAC Center, which was once home to a military population of 10,000, Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison took important actions not widely publicized, nationally, at the time. Colonel Garrison was in command during part of General William Westmoreland’s tenure as U.S. Army Chief of Staff.

After having served as deputy commander and, ultimately, commander of the WAC Center, Colonel Dorotha J. Garrison retired in October 1972. Fort McClellan Alabama was officially closed in 1999.

FOR SALE

Train Station Painting
approximately 40 Inches Square
Train Station Tracks Birds People Reynolds

Train Station Tracks Birds People Reynolds

Train Station Tracks Birds People Reynolds

This artwork is signed CLEMENTS by the artist. This work was, at first, believed to be by Father George Clements

The Back Of This Painting Has "Hersey Studios Chicago" Written, In Now Fading Pencil, On It

.

1971 Artist Signature: GAREY ©1971 D.A.C. N.Y. Litho In U.S.A

The Signature, Printed In All Capital Letters, On The Front Of This Painting Says BARRY

1912 Chicago Teacher’s College YearBook (FOR SALE)

Apollo Book signed by Fiumi Miyagi in July 1918

Apollo Book signed by Fiumi Miyagi in July 1918

Did Art Museums Have a Future?

I thank those of you who have responded to your invitation to this webpage. My thankyou here, publicly, will, rather than by name, be by quoting words attributed to some of you. I look forward to communicating with you this week, as indicated in your invite.

“If I knew grandchildren were so much fun I would have had them first”

“You have a phenomenal river” … “a state-of-the-art facility that will enhance the city’s appeal as a destination” … “… developed the way it should be.”

“Numbers are hard and fast” … “But it’s a very different process looking at a work of art or visiting with an artist” … “It’s hard to explain your emotions when you see a work of art.”

“This is an incredibly civic city” … “There’s no city like it.”

“There I was … it was a fabulous opportunity. … I wasn’t sure all the deals I worked on made sense, but I felt like it was mine.”

“We are delighted to give back to the community we enjoy so much”

“The long term success of our country depends on the success of our public schools”

“”I was fascinated when I found out that these numbers were prices and they were changing every day” … “You could see volume coming into a stock and get the sense that it was going higher” … “… everything I do today has its roots in those early tape-reading experiences”

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